Deploying your PHP app onto DigitalOcean with Peggy

We recently launched Peggy and in this post I will walk you though how to use it deploy your PHP apps: focusing on WordPress, Craft CMS and Laravel.

Below is a diagram to explain the relationships in Peggy, don’t worry about this for now but you may wish to refer back to it at a later date.

Peggy

Visit https://getpeggy.com/ and click “Sign up” — once signed in you will see the screen below.

point-1

So, let’s click “Create project” and complete the details; for this example, I will use my wedding site.

point-2

Now we’re in the project it will ask you to create an endpoint — these are environments or stages for that project. For example, development, staging, production, etc.

point-3

Click “Create endpoint” and you will be asked to add a server where an endpoint can live. So let’s click “Manage servers”.

point-4

For this project we want to build a server on DigitalOcean, let’s click “Build server”.

point-4-2

It will then ask us to connect a DigitalOcean account, so make sure you’re logged into the correct DigitalOcean account and click “Connect my account”.

point-5
Once this is complete you will see the following screen.

point-6

Let’s go back to building the server, click Servers > Build Server.

point-8

I’m going to build my development server first, and then one for production. While it’s building you should see the following screen.

point-9

We then need to wait until the server status says “ready”.

point-10

Now let’s go back to Projects > Wedding Site and click “Create endpoint”. I’m going to use the server’s IP as a domain for this example. We will use a demo WordPress repo I have in Github:

https://github.com/jasonagnew/wordpress-starter-kit

And my details will be:

Name: production
Domain: 178.62.112.223
Remote: git@github.com:jasonagnew/wordpress-starter-kit.git
Branch: master
Server: Production Server

point-11

That should take us to the following screen, where we can manage the production endpoint.

point-12

For your new server to access your repo, you’ll need to copy the public key and add it to your repo permissions.

point-13

Once that’s pasted in, we can now click deploy.

point-14

…and then view the site.

point-15

It’s important to understand how Peggy deploys apps. Each deploy in pulled into a {app}/releases/{timestamp} and once everything is ready it’s symbolically linked to {app}/current. This is great for allowing zero downtime between deploys, however it poses a problem with persistent storage.

To handle persistent storage, folder permissions and any commands like composer install or npm install, your app needs a deploy.json; see example:

{
  "commands": [
    "composer install",
    "npm install",
    "gulp build"
  ],
  "storage": {
    "public/content/uploads": 774,
    "public/content/plugins": 774
  },
  "permissions": {
    "public/.htaccess": 644
  }
}

WordPress

If you plan to use the standard WordPress file structure without any modifications (exactly as it comes in the zip from https://wordpress.org). You will need to put into a repo with the contents inside a public folder like so:

public/
   wp-admin/
   wp-content/
   wp-includes/
   wp-config.php 
   ...
deploy.json

Then your deploy.json would look this:

{
  "commands": [],
  "storage": {
    "public/wp-content/uploads": 774,
    "public/wp-content/plugins": 774,
    "public/wp-content/themes": 774,
  },
  "permissions": {
    "public/.htaccess": 644
  }
}

I would however recommend using this starter layout for future projects: https://github.com/jasonagnew/wordpress-starter-kit

Craft CMS

Using the standard Craft file structure your repo should look like this:

craft/
   app/
   config/
   plugins/
   storage/
   templates/
   web.config
public/
   .htaccess
   index.php
   robots.txt
   web.config
deploy.json

Then your deploy.json would look this:

{
  "commands": [],
  "storage": {
    "craft/app": 774,
    "craft/config": 774,
    "craft/storage": 774,
  },
  "permissions": {
    "public/.htaccess": 644
  }
}

Laravel

Using the standard Laravel file structure your repo should look like this:

app/
bootstrap/
config/
database/
public/
resources/
storage/
tests/
composer.json
...
deploy.json

Then your deploy.json would look this:

{
  "commands": [
    "composer install"
  ],
  "storage": {
    "storage": 774
  },
  "permissions": {
    "public/.htaccess": 644
  }
}

Much More

In your endpoint you can manage:

  • Environment variables: Easiest way to provide per-environment (development/production) API keys, etc.
  • Domains: Decided to buy that extra domain extension? you can add it to your endpoint in seconds.
  • Cron: No need to use `crontab -e` — it’s all handled by the dashboard.
  • Workers: If you need the power of Supervisor, you can add workers without messy `.conf` files.

On your server you can manage:

  • SSH Keys: Manage who has access to that server.
  • PHP Errors: If something goes wrong with a deployment, you can quickly toggle PHP error visibility to help debug.

Thanks for giving Peggy a go!

Want to know a little more about us?

We are a friendly bunch and love talking all things WordPress. Whether you’re using one of our open source projects, want to discuss a blog article or hire us for your next project, we would love to hear from you.

Contact us